Specimens, Mostly from the Big Bend Area

Buckets Containing Rocks that are not Agate or Jasper.   
29 buckets available at $150 each, until 4/1/2020.  After that I’ll try to sort them by location or type and charge more for them.
Some are local, and may contain flint, chert, calcite, aragonite, and picture sandstone, and perhaps basalt with druzy quartz or bigger crystals on or in them.  The buckets can also contain rocks that are not from the Big Bend, including such things as ruby in zoisite, tourmalinated quartz, llanite and others. 
Buckets of Quartz Crystal Specimens from the Big Bend.  
11 buckets available at $200 each.  
Some with calcite or aragonite. Selected because they were interesting.
Buckets of Specimen Materials, mostly from the Big Bend.   
19 buckets available at $150 each.  
Some buckets contain Massive Quartz, Granite, Obsidian & Lava, “Picture Stone”, Labradorite, Llanite (from central Texas), Septarian nodules, Fluorescent Specimens, Aragonite, or sandstone.
Buckets of Geodes and Thunder Eggs  
11 buckets available at $200 each.
Most of these were collected in the Big Bend, but some are from Mexico and were purchased. All have druzy quartz, quartz crystals, or calcite inside them.
Buckets Big Bend Region Calcite  
19 buckets available at $100 each.
There are some large and small specimens in these buckets, and they were picked up because they were more interesting than the usual calcite piece.  Some may also have quartz, aragonite or selenite as part of the specimen.
Walker Ranch Other Rock.   
1 bucket available at $100.
This bucket contains special specimens from the Walker Ranch.  Some pieces are a common-opal-like material that Frank Woodward Jr. called “low temperature quartz.”  These specimens are interesting because they have pieces on top of them that seem like they have been extruded into long, cylindrical pieces or tiny slices.  I have no idea what causes that phenomenon, but it’s sure interesting. 
Small Bucket of Walker Ranch Labradorite in the Basalt Matrix.   
1 bucket available at $20.  
The labradorite you find here is not the multicolored labradorite with schiller.  It’s yellow and clear at its best, like bytownite.  But John Sinkankas said it was Labradorite, so that’s what I call it. These specimens are not good enough to cut.
Buckets of Miscellaneous Specimens from Terlingua.   
4 buckets available at $50 each.  
These are probably not quartz, but may be calcite, selenite, aragonite, septarian nodules, and sandstone formations.
Buckets of Terlingua Nodules.    
5 buckets available at $50 each.
Terlingua Nodules are what I call these sedimentary formations from South Brewster County. Trey Woodward used to call them “gargoyles”. The formations are usually rounded, and have a shell that is at least partly silica.  While most of them are opaque and have a consistency like chert, the best ones can have a shell that is translucent quartz spherules.  Inside this hard shell has a center of a calciferous mudstone.  The mudstone often contains fossil bits.  Something caused these mudstones to form, and a silica shell formed around them.  When you boil the calciferous mud out with muriatic acid, the shell will sometimes stay together and become translucent.  And sometimes you can find silicated fossils inside the mudstone.  As far as I know, no scientific study has been done on these items, and they may be far more interesting than even I think they are!
Bucket of Flint and/or Chert from the Johnson Ranch South of Marathon, TX.   
1 bucket available at $50.  
We were invited to prospect there for agate, and didn’t find enough agate to make the ranch worthwhile for rockhounds, but we did find some beautiful flint.
Common Opal with Dendrites in it.   
3 buckets available at $150 each.  The dendrites differ from the plumes in plume agate in that they are two-dimensional, and grow in cracks after the host rock is formed.  Plumes are three-dimensional and grow before the rest of the cavity is filled with agate.