Agates and Specimens from Ranches Now Closed for Rockhunting

Buckets of cutting agate from the Walker Ranch. 
39 buckets available at $250 each.
These buckets may contain red plume agate, black plume agate, flower garden agate,  many colors of moss agate, tube agate, sagenitic agate,  and colorful pastel fortification agate (similar in color and pattern to Mexican agates such as those found at Coyamito and Laguna, these agates occur mostly at one location on the Walker Ranch, and are rare). There’s also peanut agate, where there are spherules or tiny nodules that form first and are “stuck together”, usually with a different color of agate.  When cut, the peanuts can have anything in them, from amethyst crystals to red plumes to fortification agate.  Some of the moss agates are spectacular, with a variety of colors on a translucent background.  And there are a couple of places where there’s spectacular sagenite within moss or plume agate nodules.   The Walker Ranch was sold to the same family that bought the Woodward Ranch, and they aren’t allowing rockhunting field trips on their land. 
Buckets of specimens, Walker Ranch.
50 buckets available at $200 each.  
These buckets contain material that I thought was primarily of value as specimens, where the specimens might be worth much more per pound than cutting agate is.  There will be quartz crystal geodes, plates, and interesting shapes,  agate with quartz crystals or calcite, sagenitic agate, peanut agates, nodules still in the basalt matrix, pieces that aren’t solid enough to make slabs out of, and other things. The Walker Ranch was sold to the same family that bought the Woodward Ranch, and they aren’t allowing rockhunting field trips on their land.
Buckets of agate from the Woodward Ranch. 
3 buckets available at $250 each.
These buckets are primarily composed of cutting agate, including plume, moss, and fortification agates.  The Woodward Ranch was sold several years ago, and the owners are not allowing rockhunts.
Buckets of plume agate.   
8 buckets available at $350 each.
These agates almost all come from the Bird Hills, which run through the former Woodward, Walker, and Anderson ranches.  The Woodward and Walker Ranches share a fence line, and were once the same ranch, and the Anderson Ranch was across the highway from the Walker Ranch.  It is not possible for me to determine specifically which of these three ranches a piece of agate came from, unless you were the one that picked it up and remember the piece.    The plume in these buckets most likely came from the Walker Ranch, since for many years I led field trips there, but there could  be agate from the Woodward and Anderson Ranches in the mix, too, especially as some of the agate was purchased from a ranch-hand who picked it up while doing work for the ranchers.  There may also be a some plume agate from the Red House Ranch, which adjoins the Woodward Ranch on two sides.  I purchased the estate of a rockhunter who lived and worked on that ranch for many years.
Singleton Ranch agate.   
132 buckets available at $250 each.
This ranch was south of Marfa, and comprised 10 sections.  It was very prolific, with 4 major agate fields that ranged in size from about 200 acres to over 640 acres.  These buckets are where I put the agate and other things I found at the end of each day’s hunting.  It took me 3 or 4 days of hunting to fill up a bucket.  I did not search through these buckets and sort out the agates after I put them in the buckets.  The agate included in the buckets can be bouquet agates in colors of yellow, peach, pink, orange , blue, green, red, and lavender.  There are also lots of black and white plume agates, and some of the black plume has hematite in it.  There are great fortification agates, water-level agates, and moss agates.  One lovely stone included in the buckets is a breccia of what looks like a common opal that’s been filled in with chalcedony.  The opal can be any color from white to peach to pink to orange to red, and the chalcedony can be anywhere from almost clear to almost black, with shades of blue in between.  The Singleton Ranch was originally 3 different ranches.  The heirs sold it in 2017 and the new owners divided it back into the three ranches.  The new owners are very much against allowing rockhunters on their land.
Buckets of agate, jasper and quartz specimens from the Singleton Ranch.   
24 buckets available at $200 each.  
These buckets also contain cutting pieces that I though had a greater value as specimens than they would as cutting stones.
Buckets of Stillwell Ranch agates.  
8 buckets available at $250 each.  
The Stillwell Ranch was an amazing ranch for rockhounds.  Some of the hills appeared to be huge piles of rounded rocks that came down the Rio Grande from New Mexico or Colorado in prehistory, when the river was many miles wide.  These rounded cobbles are often called “Rio Grande Agate”, and can be plume or sagenite, moss or fortification or tube agates in  just about any color. There was also petrified wood, flint, chert, fossils and calcite easily found on the ranch.  In one day, on one hillside, I found nicely agatized wood in nine different color combinations!  The Stillwell Ranch was open for rockhunting from the 1960s until the summer of 2019, when the ranch was sold. 
Bucket Stillwell Ranch specimens.   
1 bucket available at $200.
Most likely sagenitic agate and Terlingua Nodules.  Some of the sagenitic agate may be cuttable, but it can be full of tubes where there are sagenite needles of aragonite still existing in the agate, surrounded by agate but not yet replaced by agate.
Buckets of Rio Grande Agate.   
4 buckets available at $250 each.
Rio Grande agate is any type of agate that appears within 10 miles or so of the current Rio Grande, and is a waterworn cobble or a part of one.   It can be plume, moss, tube, fortification, or any other pattern or color of agate seen in the United States.  Rio Grande agate is usually found at the Stillwell Ranch, but these I purchased from an old estate.